Podcast Episode 108: Nightwing #9

 

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I enjoyed Nightwing #9 so much, I wanted to talk through it with you!

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Podcast Episode 102: DC Rebirth with sleepyreader666

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I chat a bit with Damian, sleepyreader666, about the wonderful comic books shops we visited in Portland, OR, before we dive into the first offerings of DC’s Rebirth.

Please send your comments to longboxreview@gmail.com, chat with me @longboxreview on Twitter, or visit longboxreview.com. Please subscribe, rate, and review the show via iTunes.

Thanks for listening!

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Podcast Episode 92: New Teen Titans Spotlight



To commemorate the New Teen Titans 35th anniversary (better late than never!), I talk about my favorite comic book series of all time!

Please send your comments to longboxreview@gmail.com, chat with me @longboxreview on Twitter, or visit longboxreview.com. Please subscribe, rate, and review the show via iTunes.

Thanks for listening!

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Direct Download (56:50)

RandoMonday: Nightwing: Our World’s at War #1

Here’s a comic chosen at random from my collection.

Nightwing: Our Worlds at War (2001) #1 by Chuck Dixon (writer), Rick Leonardi (penciller), John Lowe (inker), Noelle Giddings (colorist), Digital Chameleon (digital separator), Willie Schubert (letterer),  Michael Wright (editor), and Jae Lee & José Villarrubia (cover)

The randomizer actually chose Letter 44 #1, but because I already covered that particular issue in Podcast Episode 59, I went with the second choice. I cannot remember actually reading this issue, so I must have bought this in one of my shopping trips at ECCC. Regardless, I did read for this post, and it was a little underwhelming, but that’s Chuck Dixon in general to me. This one-shot involves the eponymous Our Worlds at War event. Nightwing gets a message from Barbara Gordon and so Dick arrives, he’s attacked by hitmen. It turns out that Babs became a target once she started investigating an alien computer virus. She takes Nightwing to S.T.A.R. Labs and a time machine (?!) there. The bulk of the issue involves the pair travelling through time and avoiding being killed before they are able to fool the future would-be killer.

The plot’s pretty thin to fill 38 pages, Babs is shown to be the damsel in distress way too much, and the bit involving the automobile was just confusing–where were they driving to exactly when they basically kept themselves within yards of the time machine? I don’t know if that’s a failing of the writer or the artist. Speaking of Mr. Leonardi, his work was sufficient to the task, but not extraordinary–I thought it was a bit like a McDaniel-lite. I didn’t recognize his name, but it turns out he did several issues of Nightwing that I had read after this issue came out. It’s a so-so tie-in to an event I didn’t read.

RandoMonday: Nightwing Annual #2

Here’s a comic chosen at random from my collection.

Nightwing annual 2
Nightwing Annual #2 (2007) by Marc Andreyko (writer), Joe Bennett (penciller), Jack Jadson (inker), Phil Balsman (letterer), Jason Wright (colorist), Rachel Gluckstern (assoc. editor), Joan Hilty (editor), and Bennet and Jadson (cover)

You can probably guess that I like this annual. Batgirl and Robin are on the cover, and the whole story focuses on Bab’s and Dick’s relationship over the years. It starts off with Dick proposing during the Infinite Crisis. Nightwing gets hurt, and Barbara Gordon nurses him back to health. Along the way they reminisce about their adventures together, but the story focuses on their growing feelings for one another. In one scene, Robin confesses his love to a “sleeping” Batgirl. She admits to Dick later that she had waited too long to respond, and he ended up with Koriand’r. After she was shot by the Joker, Dick shows up at her place, they make love, and the Dick tells Barbara that he’s engaged to Kory. Needless to say, Babs isn’t pleased. Also, I know that Dick has had intense feelings for Babs, but to sleep with her when he’s engaged to Kory doesn’t strike me as true to his character–it comes across as a convenient excuse to tear these two apart for a long while. At this point in the story, Batman shows up asking Dick to accompany him and Tim Drake on a world-wide trip to regroup and reconnect (did DC ever publish a story detailing what the Bat family did on that year-long trip?). It’s then that Barbara gives Dick back the engagement ring, telling him to propose after he’s found himself again and when he can fully commit to them. He leaves her a letter and the ring, promising to return to her. The last panel shows Babs looking at the ring and saying that she’s going to hold Dick to that promise. Unfortunately, that never happened. My (dim) recollection is that TPTB at DC never allowed that relationship, and by extension, the marriage to go any further. More’s the pity.

The art on this book is above average. I think the way that they drew Robin was a little too goofy for my taste (and the whole scene of them being trapped in a safe and the resulting shtick of Robin hiding a boner with his cape–come on), plus Robin looked much older than he should have been in the timeline being shown. Barbara, however, is shown very nicely throughout, albeit seemingly one age as well. Perhaps I’m being too critical. After all, this timeline is only about three years from when the two are first shown together in the story and when Kory makes an appearance. I just wish most artists wouldn’t draw teenagers as adults all the time.