52! Week Six

By Johns, Morrison, Rucka, Waid, Giffen, Bennett, Jose, Sinclair, Napolitano, Jones, Richards, and Wacker. Cover by Jones and Sinclair.

52 was a weekly series published by DC Comics starting in May, 2006. Because I had my 52nd birthday in late 2020, I thought it might be interesting (fun?) to examine this series 15 years later. I plan to post once a week about each issue. To read previous posts, click the link (52!).

Synopsis

“China Syndrome”

Week 6, Day 1. Booster Gold pays an actor for portraying a villain he fought. In China, Green Lanterns Hal Jordan and John Stewart fight the Great Ten in pursuit of Evil Star.

Dr. Magnus visits Professor Morrow again, while a technician installs a camera to monitor Morrow. Someone has hijacked the video feed and is also watching Morrow.

The fight with the Great Ten turns for the worse with the Green Lanterns  when Black Adam arrives. Adam explains that China has joined his coalition. Fortunately for the Green Lanterns, Russia has not joined with Adam and offers the Lanterns safe passage.

Week 6, Day 2. Booster Gold and Skeets arrive at Rip Hunter’s underground bunker in Arizona. There, Booster finds Hunter’s chalkboard notes that proclaim that time is broken and it’s Booster’s fault.

Thoughts

“China Syndrome” shares its title with the 1979 movie, and also references a nuclear catastrophe where the components melt through the Earth to China. So, is the analogy here that the Green Lanterns are the “syndrome”? Or is it Black Adam? His coalition is certainly gaining momentum, so I’m curious how this plays out (I don’t really recall), but I have a feeling the creators whiff this one. They certainly spent a lot of real estate on this conflict (11 pages), but at least it was nice to look at.

Speaking of Green Lantern, Hal’s reference to Black Adam’s murder of Terra-Man seemed oddly … tone deaf, calling it “a tad theatrical”. Oof. Finally, the Great Ten are certainly an interesting new group of super characters with a lot of potential. A pity they weren’t used more/better. I should seek out the mini series and other appearances.

In the conversation between Morrow and Magnus, the scene starts off with an egg, and I believe we saw an egg or something shaped like an egg last issue, so considering who they are teasing, this foreshadowing was fun to see. It’s almost Watchmen-esque, I dare say. I also find the bit of dialogue from whom is being teased to be quite funny:

Servant: If it’s all right to call you “Great One.”

“Great One”: I’m fine with that. Now GO!

Booster is not fairing very well in this series. In fact he’s slipped from annoying glory hound to pathetic loser. At least we get the famous Rip Hunter “crazy board”. I remember reading this the first time and being excited about what all of it meant. The internet message boards were also abuzz about it. Let’s see what I can glean from this. Keep in mind, I know the outcome of some of this material, but have forgotten or just don’t know the result of others.

Time Is Broken:

  • “52” abounds in this scene. Not only multiple times on the chalkboards, but in pages on the floor (520 Kane) and on clock or other digital displays.
  • There are more numbers on paper on the floor: 51, 53, 54, 55, 56. Considering the focus on 52, those higher numbers are intriguing.
  • Other pages of interest on the floor:
    • Infinity, Inc. — Were they bringing back this team?! (Yes, but differently.)
    • Casey the Cop — I still have no idea who this is.
    • Silverblade — same
    • Find the Sun Devils — It was these kinds of hints that got the DC fan in me excited. While I had not read Sun Devils, I knew of it and liked the idea of DC bringing back these older concepts — it was almost like the early to mid-80s when DC was trying all sorts of unusual and interesting concepts and formats.
    • What is Spanner’s Galaxy? — Same as the prior note for this series.
    • Finally, a bound book has the title of “Who’s Who”. :)
  • There’s also the globe behind the chalkboard with “World War III Why? How?” written in red text. Of course, we’d get to that much later in the run of 52.
  • Chalkboard 1:
    • Dead by lead? — Daxamite’s are “allergic” to lead. A reference to Mon-El in the 20th century?
    • Not only is Time Is Broken, “further time is different”. The omission of the comma after “further” could change the meaning of this phrase: “further time” could mean future time. Or was Rip just being lazy in his writing?
    • The four horsemen will end her rain — I know we eventually get the mini series involving the Four Horsemen, but “rain”? Is that just a misspelling of “reign”? If so, whose reign? If not, what?!
    • He won’t smell it — What the Rock is cooking???
    • Find the last “El” — Which one is that?
    • What looks like “sonic disruption” is scribbled over at the end (“sonic disrupt”), and “disrupt” is also crossed out. — The DC multiverse is often described as existing on different vibrational frequencies, but they’re aren’t sonic in nature. There was also a mini series in the late 80s called Sonic Disruptors.
    • Apparently pointing down from the “sonic” line is Time Masters –> Time Servants — This sounds ominous. I really don’t know Rip Hunter’s history well enough to speculate what this could mean, other than DC appears to be expanding his role.
    • The reach — Repeated three times. Have no clue what this is.
    • The tornado is in pieces — Obviously a reference to the destroyed Red Tornado.
    • “I’m not kryptonite” — ???
    • It hurts to breathe — ???
    • The scarab is eternal? — Expanding the Blue Beetle mythos?
    • There are a few arrows pointing from circled 52s to a circled “Earth”. — Is this just the conceit that “our” Earth is at the center of the multiverse?
    • Also pointing toward that “Earth” is “Where is the Curry heir?” — Was Aquaman dead at this time?
    • Who is Super Nova? — Ahh! I remember this one exciting me more than some of the others, but I had misremembered the character of Nova (Superman’s identity when his lost his powers in a couple stories in World’s Finest Comics from the late 60s) as this one.
    • Man of Steel — Who is this referencing? Clark Kent or John Henry Irons?
  • Chalkboard 2:
    • Pointing from the word “Broken”, there are several items:
      • “What happened to the son of Superman?” — Was this a reference to the Super Sons backup stories from the 70s?
      • Pointing from that is “Who is Diana Prince?” — I don’t recall, but is this where we get the eventual return of Diana’s alter ego?
      • Where is the Batman? — Don’t worry, he’ll be back.
      • Pointing from that is “Who is the Batwoman?” — Hinting at the debut of the best version of that character.
      • Te versus (Au + Pb) — Te is Tellurium and has the atomic number of 52 on the periodic table. Au and Pb is an obvious reference to two of the Metal Men.
      • Don’t ask the Question. It lies. — Works on a couple levels. Is this big Q (i.e., the character) or little Q (concept) “question”? If the former, why “it”?
      • Secret Five! — ???
      • Who is Super Nova? — Significance of a second appearance?
      • World War III? Why? How? — Notice this time there is a question mark this time after WW III.
      • Pointing from a circled 52 is “Immortal Savage” — Hinting at a big change for the character?
      • Someone is monitoring. They see us. They see me. — Monitors? Something else?
      • Khimaera lives again — Had to look this up and relates to Hawkgirl during the One Year Later run.
      • The Lazarus Pit rises — Probably One Year Later Batman related?
      • The old gods are dead, the new gods want what’s left. — Bringing back the Fourth World characters again?
      • I’m supposed to be dead / When am I? / OTHERS? — No wonder Rip Hunter went into hiding (or is he captured?). Imagine having the insight that Rip does and knowing that you aren’t where (or maybe when?) you are supposed to be (or not to be); it might drive you crazy.
    • On the adjacent page to the chalkboards is a broken time bubble ship with screens behind it depicting either significant moments in time or what are possibly variations in the timeline:
      • Prisoner 7053 — Rosa Parks after her arrest.
      • Abe Lincoln with General Grant (?).
      • A ship with a cross on its sails.
      • What looks like Elvis singing at Sun Records.
      • Native Americans throwing boxes over the side of a ship — This is what made me think of timeline alterations. What if this is a alternate reality where the Native Americans threw the British tea into Boston Harbor?
      • A T-Rex
    • There are a plethora of clocks all around the lab indicating what I presume is 11:52. It could also be a Watchmen reference?
    • Finally, there is a magnet dangling from a tripod. Given how the magnet is colored, it’s clearly supposed to draw your attention, but I don’t understand the significance.

History of DCU, part 5

by Dan Jurgens, Andy Lanning, Guy Major, Jeromy Cox, Nick J. Napolitano, Eddie Berganza, Ivan Cohen, and Jeanine Schaefer

Post-Crisis recitation (highlights):

  • The new Justice League and Suicide Squad
  • The death of Jason Todd and the debut of Tim Drake as Robin
  • Millennium and Invasion
  • Team Titans
  • Death of Superman and Bane breaking Batman’s back
  • Return of the Supermen
  • The character assassination of Hal Jordan and the debut of Kyle Rayner as the sole Green Lantern

“Zero Hour was coming.”

Pull List Review – December 2020 Comics

Direct Download (35:23)

I talk about the following comics I read during December 2020:

  • DC’s Very Merry Multiverse 80-Page Giant
  • Batman/Catwoman #1
  • The Union #1
  • Action Comics #1028
  • Superman #28
  • The Green Lantern #10
  • Justice League Dark #28

Please send your comments to longboxreview@gmail.com, chat with me @longboxreview on Twitter, or visit longboxreview.com.

Thanks for listening!

52! Week Five

by Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka, Mark Waid, Keith Giffen, Chris Batista, Jimmy Palmiotti, Alex Sinclair, Phil Balsman, Jann Jones, Harvey Richards, and Stephen Wacker. Cover by J.G. Jones and Alex Sinclair.

52 was a weekly series published by DC Comics starting in May, 2006. Because I had my 52nd birthday in late 2020, I thought it might be interesting (fun?) to examine this series 15 years later. I plan to post once a week about each issue. To read previous posts, click the link (52!).

Synopsis

“Stars in Their Courses”

Week 5, Day 1. Ellen Baker, wife of Buddy Baker (Animal Man), takes down a “Welcome Home” banner from her house, telling her daughter that her neighbors told her that she is in “denial”. Just then, Alan Scott, the original (and best) Green Lantern appears to tell her that Animal Man was missing in action. Ellen replies, “‘Missing’, huh? So there’s still hope”, as she unfurls the banner.

In Metropolis, Lex Luthor has announced that synthesized the metagene, which means that “every man and woman can be a superhero”.

Steel is listening to this news when he receives a call to come to St. Camillus, a hospital that now treats superhuman ailments. He consults with Dr. Pieter Cross, aka Doctor Mid-Nite, and Green Lantern Alan Scott, asking about the 25-foot tall, unconscious Hawkgirl that he saw outside. Green Lantern explains that she was part of the team he led into outer space and that there was an accident involving zeta beam technology. It fused Firestorm and Cyborg into one, deformed body and pieces of Red Tornado into Mal Duncan’s (Herald) body. Alan thinks the fractured zeta beams also tore apart Adam Strange, Animal Man, and Starfire. And we learn that Alan’s daughter, Jade, also died. It’s then that Mal goes into cardiac arrest.

In Gotham City, Captain Maggie Sawyer pays a visit to the recuperating Renee Montoya. Sawyer wants to know what exactly happened to Renee because despite what Renee told her, the warehouse is clean and there is no evidence of what Renee recounted. Sawyer is concerned that Renee is in over her head and wants to help, but Renee rebuffs the Captain, who then leaves.

Back at St. Camillus, Steel shock’s Mal, causing the attached Red Tornado part on his chest–a speaker–to replay Tornado’s last words:

It’s coming! 52! 52!

Week 5, Day 7. On an alien world, Buddy Baker wonders aloud to Starfire if the heroes back on Earth won. Starfire wonders how far away from Earth they are and if Adam Strange will be able to get them back home. Buddy encourages Adam to work faster because something is out there, waiting.

Thoughts

The first thing that struck me about this issue was the title. “Stars in Their Courses” has to be referencing Isaac Asimov’s astronomy essay, “The Stars in Their Courses” (and not the Civil War book by Shelby Foote), but I don’t know what connection that essay has to this story. Anyone read that essay and can shed some light on this?

How odd that we only have two days this week. I reviewed the issue multiple times in case I had missed a time stamp. However, I like that not every issue has to have the same time structure (i.e., every few pages is a new day) within the already established pattern of every issue IS a week in the DCU.

Lex Luthor’s metagene announcement should have had more of an impact on this series and the DCU, based on what I can recall, so I’ll be paying more attention to that this time around. I liked the look that Lois and Clark give each other as they listen to this news.

I love Ellen Baker’s belief that her husband will return and Buddy’s total devotion to his wife despite a wet, naked, alien princess walking around him — he doesn’t even really look at Starfire. I know from reading The Last Days of Animal Man that there is some sort of connection, perhaps even attraction?, between Buddy and Koriand’r, so I’ll be looking for that in this series (but I hope it’s not there — that would be easy, lazy storytelling).

A small thing: when we see Hawkgirl lying unconscious on the bed of a semi, I estimated her height based on the other characters around her and thought she was between 20-25 feet tall. It was gratifying when Steel explicitly states she’s 25-feet tall. I appreciate that attention to detail by the artist.

Alan Scott’s emotional state was the highlight of this issue. He was referred to in The Golden Age as the “big guy”, and while that’s an Elseworld’s story, I’ve thought of Alan as the big guy ever since. However, even big guys break down at times, and seeing Alan’s stoic composure start to crumble as he describes what happened to his team was a small, but powerful moment.  After that, he pauses and then looks at Steel, asking him,

A man shouldn’t have to mourn his own children, should he? We shouldn’t have to bury our children.

Gut wrenching…. We didn’t really need the button a few word balloons later where Alan tells Steel that his daughter, Jade, also died.

Finally, “52” as a concept makes itself known in the series. I remember wondering what this could mean. Sure, the sly references to the series title up to this point were cute and all, but what did Red Tornado see?! I also recall being happy about what it did eventually mean, but we’ll get to that much later.

History of DCU, part 4

by Dan Jurgens, Norm Rapmund, Guy Major, Jeromy Cox, Rob Leigh, Eddie Berganza, Ivan Cohen, and Jeanine Schaefer

The major losses in Crisis on Infinite Earths — Supergirl and Flash dying — and the finale of the series is summarized. This installment offered me nothing new or interesting. Why are they wasting valuable pages on this stuff?! I know, I know, it’s to inform any new readers pulled into the DCU after Infinite Crisis, but they could at least try to make these few pages interesting to old timers too!

LBR X Retrosode 6: New Teen Titans Spotlight

Direct Download (57:51)

LBR X logo 1400

2020 is the 10th anniversary of the Longbox Review podcast, and to celebrate, I am spotlighting 10 episodes from the archive. This is a rebroadcast of episode 92 from 2015 where I talk about one of my very favorite comic book titles of all time, The New Teen Titans.

Thank you for supporting the podcast over these 10 years.

Original post: https://longboxreview.com/2015/12/19/podcast-episode-92-new-teen-titans-spotlight/

RandoMonday: Green Lantern Corps: Recharge #5

Here’s a comic chosen at random from my collection.

GLCRecharge 5

Green Lantern Corps: Recharge #5 by Dave Gibbons, Geoff Johns, Patrick Gleason, Prentis Rollins, Travis Lanham, Moose Baumann, Michael Siglain, Peter Tomasi, and Gleason, Rollins, and Baumann (cover)

“Stardeath”

After the success of Green Lantern: Rebirth, DC Comics decided to relaunch the Green Lantern Corps. The Guardians are back and are recruiting (to have a total corps of 7200), which is a good thing because Lanterns across the universe were being murdered in previous issues. Guy Gardner and Kyle Rayner investigate, meeting several new recruits along the way, and eventually battle the Spider Guild from the Vega system.

In this issue, the Spiders have attacked Oa and Kilowog calls all Lanterns to the Central Power Battery where Guy leads the Corps in reciting their oath and recharging their rings. Using their collective power, they negate the Spider Guild’s plan of destroying Oa’s sun by shoving it down a wormhole to destroy the Guild in Vega. The Guardians reward Guy’s leadership by promoting him to Lantern Number One of the Corps Honor Guard. The issue ends with new recruit Soranik Natu telling the others that while the Corps is wounded, it will heal and will be “stronger than ever”.

One of the ways I judge a successful Green Lantern book is how deftly the color artist deals with all the green. While Baumann does a decent enough job, especially the space-based scenes where he got a chance to use more of the color palette. However, Gleason’s and Rollins’ use of thick blacks detracted somewhat from the colors. Speaking of the inker, I would later prefer Mick Gray’s inks with Gleason’s pencils.

The story in this issue is pretty stock, meaning that the heroes rally and defeat the villains without much sacrifice. But I did really like that two-page spread where the Corps recharge their rings while citing the oath. But the ending came off as abrupt to me, almost as if this was an ongoing series and issue 6 would continue where this issue left off. Overall, this is one of the weaker issues of the series, and the strength of this mini-series is in the introduction of the new recruits in the previous issues, especially Soranik Natu. If you’re a Green Lantern Corps fan and completist, then I suggest you read this to see the introductions of several Lanterns who would appear in later series.

There is an overpriced trade of this collection available, as well as a much more affordable digital version at Comixology.